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Boy Scout Troop 289
(Clarksville, Tennessee)
 
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http://troop289clarksvilletn.ScoutLander.com

  
 

Welcome to Boy Scout Troop 289






   Waving American Flag

This Web site is for information about Boy Scout Troop 289 in Clarksville, Tennessee. We are a member of the Cogioba District which serves Houston, Montgomery,Steward Counties and Fort Campbell, KY in the Western Service Area of the Middle Tennessee Council. 

                                               
We support the Anawaha Chapter of the Wa-Hi-Nasa 111 Lodge, Order Of The Arrow.

Our Troop is open to anyone to join. We are one of the newest Boy Scout Troops in the area. We are always in need of adult leaders, as well as new or returning scouts. Please drop us a line and we will set you up with a chance of a life time to help us grow. Our Troop is chartered by American Legion CSM Gary W. Crisp Post 289 in Clarksville. We meets at The Daymar College on Trenton Road.  

Our Scoutmaster is Mr.  
 Scott Elridge

We have a very active Troop Adult Committee and our Troop is always in need of new and former Scout Leaders, Our Troop Committee Chair person is Mrs. Monica Rios,
 Email:  Phone#: 


If you are interested in scouting in any area just come by and see us or contact our Troop by email.

For more information please contact the Middle Tennessee Council Boy Scouts of America located in Nashville,Tn by calling (615) 383-9724 or 1-800-899-7268. 

 For more information about Scouting in Middle Tennessee, please visit the website for the Middle Tennessee Council Boy Scouts of America at www.mtcbsa.org

For general information about Scouting and the various programs, please visit the website for the national organization for the Boy Scouts of America at www.Scouting.org.

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Our Website Disclaimer:  

  

Troop 289 does not speak on behalf of the BSA nor our Charter Unit.   The opinions expressed on these web pages are those of the Scout leaders of Troop 289. Logos, badges, insignias, and buttons are the copyright and/or trademark of their respective owners.The things found on these pages are intended for the use of Troop 289, The Charter Unit and its families. Boy Scouts Of America Troop 289 is not responsible for any misrepresentation or misinformation regarding the BSA, Council or District organization. Troop 289 is not responsible for any errors contained on this site.   Please contact the Webmaster regarding any corrections.   This site is for your Scouting benefit.   Please Enjoy


 BSA

The Scout Law



A scout is
Trustworthy,
Loyal,
Helpful,
Friendly,
Courteous,
Kind,
Obedient,
Cheerful,
Thrifty,
Brave,
Clean,
and
Reverant

The Scout Oath



The Scout Oath



On my honor I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the scout law; to help other people ay all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

The Scout Motto





Be Prepared!

In various languages, it has been used by millions of Scouts around the world since 1907.

Of course, it is no coincidence that this motto can be shortened to B. P. and Robert Baden-Powell, the founder of the movement, used to shorten his surname into B.-P.

In the third part of Scouting for Boys dated February 12, 1908, Robert Baden-Powell explains the meaning of the phrase:

The Scout Motto is: BE PREPARED which means you are always in a state of readiness in mind and body to do your DUTY.

  • Be Prepared in Mind by having disciplined yourself to be obedient to every order, and also by having thought out beforehand any accident or situation that might occur, so that you know the right thing to do at the right moment, and are willing to do it.
  • Be Prepared in Body by making yourself strong and active and able to do the right thing at the right moment, and do it.

The Scout Salute



The Scout salute shows respect. Use it to salute the flag of the United States of America. You may also salute a Scout leader or another Scout.

Give the Scout salute by forming the Scout sign with your right hand and then bringing that hand upward until your forefinger touches the brim of your hat or the arch of your right eyebrow. The palm of your hand should not show

The Scout Slogan




Do a Good Turn Daily!

Some Good Turns are big - saving a life, helping out after floods or other disasters, recycling community trash, working with your patrol on conservation projects.

But Good Turns are often small, thoughtful acts - helping a child cross a busy street, going to the store for an elderly neighbor, cutting back brush that is blocking a sign, doing something special for a brother or sister, welcoming a new student to your school.

A Good Turn is more than simple good manners. It is a special act of kindness. 

The Scout Hand Shake



Our Scout salute and handshake are ancient signs of bravery and respect. During the colonial period of our country, many men carried weapons for protection.

Sometimes when they met one another, there was an uneasy moment as each man watched the others right hand. If it went to his sword or his gun, there might be a fight. but if it went to his hat, it was a salute of friendship and respect.

The left handshake comes to us from the Ashanti warriors whom Lord Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting, knew almost 100 years ago in West Africa. He saluted them with his right hand, but the Ashanti chiefs offered their left hands and said, "In our land only the bravest of the brave shake hands with the left hand, because to do so we must drop our shields and our protection."

The Ashantis knew of Baden-Powell's bravery because they had fought against him and with him, and they were proud to offer the left hand of bravery.

When you use the Scout salute and handshake, remember that they are signs of respect and courage.

The left hand is also closer to the heart...

The Scout Sign


The Scout sign shows you are a Scout. Give it each time you recite the Scout Oath and Law. When a Scout or Scouter raises the Scout sign, all Scouts should make the sign, too, and come to silent attention.

To give the Scout sign, cover the nail of the little finger of your right hand with your right thumb, then raise your right arm, bent in a 90-degree angle, and hold the three middle fingers of your hand upward. Those fingers stand for the three parts of the Scout Oath. Your thumb and little finger touch to represent the bond that unites Scouts throughout the world

The Boy Scout Emblem



  1. The three points of the trefoil stand for the three parts of the Scout Oath.
  2. The shape of the Scout badge means that a Scout can point the right way in life as truly as does a compass in the field.
  3. There are two stars on the badge. They symbolize truth and knowledge.
  4. The eagle and shield stand for freedom and a Scout's readiness to defend that freedom.
  5. The scroll bearing the Scout motto is turned up at the ends as a reminder that a Scout smiles as he does his duty.
  6. The knot at the bottom of the scroll serves as a reminder of the Scout slogan, Do a Good Turn Daily.

The Out Door Code



The Outdoor Code

As an American, I will do my best to -

  • Be clean in my outdoor manners.
    I will treat the outdoors as a heritage.
    I will take care of it for myself and others
    I will keep my trash and garbage out of lakes, streams, fields, woods, and roadways.
  • Be careful with fire.
    I will prevent wildfire.
    I will build my fires only where they are appropriate.
    When I have finished using a fire, I will make sure it is cold out.
    I will leave a clean fire ring, or remove all evidence of my fire.
  • Be considerate in the outdoors.
    I will treat public and private property with respect.
    I will use low-impact methods of hiking and camping.

and

  • Be conservation minded
    I will learn how to practice good conservation of soil, waters, forests, minerals, grasslands, wildlife, and energy.
    I will urge others to do the same.

The Fleur-de-Lis



In Scouting's early years, critics accused Baden-Powell of trying to turn boys into soldiers, holding up as evidence the Scout symbol, which they called "a spear-head, the emblem of battle and bloodshed". The Founder quickly replied, The crest is the "Fleur-de-Lis", a lily, the emblem of peace and purity.

In truth, he had chosen as Scouting's emblem the sign for the North Point, universally shown on maps, charts and compass cards, because "it points in the right direction (and upwards), turning neither to the right nor left, since these lead backward again..." Lady Baden-Powell added later, "It shows the true way to go."

Baden-Powell explained the origins of this sign. In the Middle Ages, mariner Flavio Gioja designed it to make the seaman's compass more reliable. In Italian, North was "Tramontana". Gioja used a capital "T" to mark it, and in deference to King Charles of Naples, whose crest was the Fleur-de-Lis, combined the letter with that emblem.

To explain the meaning of the Scout emblem, Baden-Powell said, "The two stars on the two side arms stand for the two eyes of the Wolf Cub having been opened before he became a Scout... The three points of the Fleur-de-Lis remind the Scout of the three points of the Scout's Promise..."

In the World Scout emblem, the Fleur-de-Lis is surrounded by a circle of rope tied with a reef knot to symbolize the strength and unity of the world brotherhood of Scouting: "Even as one cannot undo a reef knot, no matter how hard one pulls on it, so as it expands, the movement remains united."

The three tips of the Fleur-de-Lis represent the three main parts of the Scout promise: duty to God, obedience to the Scout Law, and service to others. The two five-point stars stand for truth and knowledge, and the 10 points on the stars remind us of the 10 points of the Scout law. The ring holding the emblem together represents the bond of brotherhood.

The symbol is white on a royal purple background, colors Baden-Powell chose because, in heraldry, white stands for purity and purple for leadership and helping others.

Since Scouting began, over 200 million Scouts have worn the Scout symbol, making it one of the more highly recognized emblems in the world. Today, over 150 World Scouting countries and territories, more than 16 million members continue to wear it with pride.